Friday, May 14, 2010

Bold Moves that Separate Great Companies from the Rest

Every great business owner or management team knows that making bold strategic decisions can help them differentiate themselves from the competition. Whether the moves they make are as simple as being honest with the public regarding their company or desires; or as complex as changing technology to protect their corner of the market – they are taking risks and therefore creating their own destiny.

A new weekly publication on ChannelWeb’s crn.com is profiling 10 such companies each week that ‘Came to Win’, by documenting the bold or sometimes more strategic moves businesses are making. Some of those listed include: Apple, Google, Cisco, Verizon, Dell, IBM and HP. There’s no doubt that these are all leaders in their respective industries and there’s good chance that others can learn from their strategies.

We chose our top three favorites from the list:
Apple: In what some would call a ruthless move, Apple changed the terms of its iPhone Developer Program license agreement to prohibit cross-compilers, which previously allowed outsiders to develop iPhone apps. This notably excludes other companies such as Adobe Flash and Microsoft among others from making money off of Apple.

Verizon: Verizon CEO Ivan Seidenberg chose to be transparently honest when he came right out and said that they want the iPhone, and that their network is plenty capable of handling the increased traffic iPhone users would bring. This move could cause some iPhone buyers who love their Verizon network to hold off on switching to AT&T in hopes of an agreement between Apple and Verizon.

HP: While there’s no proof that the HP Slate (the rival to Apple’s iPad) comparison slide came from HP, many believe it was ‘leaked’ from them. The slide shows a side by side comparison of HP’s Windows 7-powered Slate and its apparent advantages over iPad in terms of processing, graphics, connectivity and cameras. This ‘leak’ managed to take some of the spotlight away from Apple, which is no small accomplishment.

To read about the rest of the 10 companies profiled, click here.

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